“A change — but no improvement!” by Mr. Ashton Bradley

anguillian
By anguillian August 31, 2012 09:11

“A change — but no improvement!” by Mr. Ashton Bradley

 

We are halfway there and what did we get out of it? Nothing but a load of contention and loose talk about the irrelevance education in our political system; how many half hotels are required to complete our economic level of development; and propaganda and conjecture about how much the outside world would give us if we dump Britain and decide to go it alone.  It is now time to do a reality check and face the fact that the result of the last election amounts to a “change without improvement”.  The question is how have we benefitted?  Are our needs being better met than before? Have the election promises been fulfilled? Is Anguilla now a more desirable place in which to invest, or are we just drifting in the wind without a compass, sailing on a “wing and a prayer”? Are we happy with “how de country running”? What are we going to do next time?

 

Five years in the life of a budding country is a long time to waste. We cannot afford to repeat this charade. And, as the saying goes, “if a man plays a trick on you once — shame on him. If he plays a trick on you twice shame on you!” Already some people are expressing the view that they regret the way they cast their vote last election. For them it was a bad mistake. a mistake they hope to correct at their next opportunity to vote. In the end, whatever action is taken at the up-coming election must be done in the light of where we were at the last election, and where we are now with this regime in power. We must therefore draw on our ability to think and make rational decisions.

 

When we retrace our step, now, it is obvious that no worthwhile change has occurred. There is no mention of new projects. The island is full of a type of gossip and scandal that we do not need. In fact there has not been a single positive new idea advanced by the ruling party since it came to power. Despite the criticism offered by them on things the AUF did — they, at best, could only duplicate or emulate what was promoted. The most famous case in point is that of the “special assistants and special advisers to the government”. Here we see blatant hypocrisy. These people had so vociferously criticized the creation, use and wages of those positions. Now that they have the power in their hands to implement their views, what have they done? “Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive!” Not only has this government deceived us with their pre-election propaganda. And after having not been able to accomplish anything they campaigned on, they are now displaying arrogance along with their impotence.

 

All over the world governments are assessed not by rhetoric but by what they achieved during their term in office. Anguilla should not be any different. Governments stand or fall on their ability to promote better living conditions for their people. That is why we need to constantly point out to this government that it is not achieving. It has in fact failed. The people of Anguilla are aware of the development that took place under the AUF administration, particularly the modernization of administrative functions in the departments. We have become more competent than ever before.

It is obvious that at this point in our adventure this ship, Anguilla, is “hard on” and we must get some capable people to help us pull her off. “She een going no where!” The AUF recognizes that there is no monopoly on ideas and therefore invites “all men of goodwill,” with the best interests ofAnguillaat heart, to join the party under the leadership of Mr. Banks in order to steer the proper course. The island needs to be rescued now! The boat is on the rocks and the captain “don’t know where de breeze blowing from!” What a ting! In his mid-term speech, Mr. Banks exposed how far into nothingness this place has drifted. And his speech in itself tells of a man of a superior political calibre compared to those persons who now parade as leaders. It is becoming clear and certain that to put Anguilla back on a road to growth we must embrace the AUF.

 

Tourism is a fickle industry and an island cannot afford to allow anything to tarnish its image. Ask the people of St Croix! During the years of AUF administration there was a cordial, non-stressful relationship with HMG and an amicable “open for business” approach to investors. Now that is all gone — and is so badly needed. The leadership of the AUF based, on past manifestos, is bent on maintaining Anguilla’s image as a great place to invest. Recognizing that with foreign investment we can develop our island, like every self-respecting Anguillian, the AUF leadership desires that as we advance economically — we likewise advance in our level of political autonomy.  However, what we must do first is like the question of what comes first – the chicken or the egg? I believe that, for us, the most pressing need is to promote ourselves in such manner that investors, both local and foreign, will come back and put money in our system and help us build an economy so that we can support full-autonomy. That is the real struggle that needs to be understood and given priority at this juncture. The stuff that is being peddled now is ludicrous.

The failure of this regime confirms the proverbial saying: “Empty vessels make the most noise”. Goodness! They had so much to say about taxation; special assistants; the airport; MOUs and MOAs; the man from Guadeloupe with all that money to spend on Anguilla – and after all that “tra-la-la” — wah we get? Wey di man from Guadeloupe! He mussa gone Martinique or de money done! It goes to show the impotence of this government! They should change their acronym from AUM to NATO meaning “no action talk only!” Now they singing: “There is a brown girl in the ring tra la la,” because they een got nutten to sing bout! Not a ting! We know dem good now and we een want um back! They have proven to be useless.

 

On a comparative basis, the improvement in this country is the weakest in the post-revolution era. We must consider this period as the Anguillian inter-regnum – and see it as the period that taught us that we must think before we cast our vote. Because casting our vote stupidly could come back to haunt us like a bad “jumbee”.  We made a change — but halfway there, and we have seen no improvement.

anguillian
By anguillian August 31, 2012 09:11

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